About Pam Preslar

9 July 2013

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About Pam Preslar

In my own words

Hello friends! I am Pam Preslar, founder of this web site. I design and maintain this site and, write the tutorials, fill the tool orders and have all the fun.

I started with jewelry making when, out of boredom one summer, I took a bead loom weaving class. This was a total opposite to the college program I was trying to get accepted to. I was immediately stricken by those little bits of glass. I fell for them, hard. Almost as instantaneously, I was onto a plan to own a bead store. A week later I did – a small store. Nothing in my life has ever lined up so quickly!

Tanzanite and Sterling Pendant

Tip: You can click on any picture to go to the related tutorial.

Favorite Technique: Combining Techniques

I have learned many different techniques from some of the greatest bead workers and wire workers around, and I had to master these quickly, to keep my bead store interesting. I like to combine techniques into one piece. I like them intricate and overdone. But mostly I want to enjoy the process.

Chevron and Sterling Wire Wrapped Necklace

My Design style: “Attention to Detail”

I appreciate details and rarely just whip something up quickly. When I create a piece I keep working at it until I love it. I do the same thing with my tutorials. I do not leave out details and I strive to make them a work that anyone can follow and understand.

Planets Necklace

“Planets”: Beaded Beads

My favorite piece is not for the wall flower. It works equally well with jeans and a t-shirt as with that little black dress. I made it many years ago and I put it on the cover of my book, Beaded Beads and More. It was distributed by Beadsmith for years. I’ve now expanded it and made it into a series of tutorials which are here at BooksByPam.com.

Me as a Teacher: Beads 101

Having just completed an MBA, I thought running a bead store will be easy. People will come in, buy beads, go home and make jewelry. Right? Wrong! If I wanted to sell beads I had to teach people what to make with them, and I only knew one technique. I had to learn many more and I had to figure it all out, fast. The real Business of Beads 101.

Back then there was no Google or YouTube [gasp!]. I to learn to make jewelry and my store had to become known. My brainstorm was a “Visiting Artist Series.” I contacted artists I found in the book The New Beadwork. One fine beadwork artist, Cheri Mossie, lived just down the street! She became a regular teacher and a lifelong friend. Many other artists came from all over the country and my customers loved it!!

A bit more about me as a Teacher:

I had to understand a variety of techniques so I could teach them to customers and I did that all day long for years. I had the pleasure of trying lots of things with a store full of fine beads at my fingertips. I still teach and still experience the great joy of students hitting that ah ha! moment, thrilled to have mastered a new found ability.
Handwoven Beaded Purse in Bronze

I think I learn most by teaching. When I want to master a technique I immerse myself in it and work with it over and over. I experiment with making it larger, smaller, combining it with another technique, hammering it, twisting it and then starting over again. And when I get to teach it to someone, that’s when I REALLY learn it.

My great moment:

My customers wanted bead graph paper but there was no source for it. So, I made some and that became A Beadworker’s Toolbook. I sent it to Beadsmith’s owner and, not only did he order hundreds of copies at-a-time for years, he had me send it to a new magazine he was distributing. The result was Issue 13 of Bead & Button contained a review of my book and that generated orders…for many years! I still sell it on Amazon.com.

And last but not least…

Create your own style with the techniques you learn from my tutorials and other sources. Master them, add them to your own jewelry-making tool box.

Never Did Get into that College Program!

They never did allow me to enter a PhD program. Oh well, things turned out better for me this way!

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